My Blog
By Millenium Pediatrics
December 04, 2017
Tags: Sick Children  

Sick Child

Colds may be common, but that does not mean caring for your child’s cold is easy. To help your little one feel better, your pediatrician is available to offer tips on what you need to know about your child’s cold. The common children’s cold is a viral infection of the upper respiratory tract that usually lasts a week or two.  

The typical preschool-age child may experience 6-10 colds per year. Most colds resolve on their own with rest and fluids, but some may lead to ear infections, sinus infections, asthma attacks or other complications.  

Caused by viruses, colds can be spread through a sneeze or cough. The virus may also be spread indirectly, through touching the hand of a healthy person or even by using door handles with your hand you may have just sneezed or coughed into. Once the virus is present and multiplying, your child will develop the familiar symptoms and signs:

  • Runny nose
  • Sneezing
  • Mild fever, particularly in the evening
  • Decreased appetite
  • Sore throat
  • Cough
  • On-and-off irritability
  • Slightly swollen glands

Many parents become confused about the proper way to treat a coughing, sneezing child, because colds and allergies often have overlapping symptoms. When in doubt, talk to your pediatrician who will know exactly what is causing your child’s symptoms, especially if they are persistent or worsen with time.  

If your child has a typical cold without complications, the symptoms should disappear on their own after seven to ten days. Your pediatrician may want to see your child if symptoms do not improve and is not completely recovered within one week from the start of their illness.  

Contact your pediatrician for further treatment and to better understand your child’s cold symptoms.

By Millenium Pediatrics
November 15, 2017
Category: Children's Health
Tags: Baby Home  

Baby Proofing Your Home

When your little one turns into baby-on-the-go, it's time to start baby proofing your home. While you cannot create an environment that is 100% safe, you can take the best measures to protect your baby with help from your pediatrician. Here's everything you need to know about locking down the dangers that lurk behind your cupboards and more.

Bathroom

In your bathroom, start by turning down the water temperature on the water heater. When you put your baby in the bath, it is easiest to avoid any burning problem by keeping the temperature lower.  Also, consider purchasing and installing toilet lid locks to protect your baby, as well.

Windows

With your windows, install window guards or adjust windows so they cannot open more than six inches. Be sure to tie up cords to blinds, as well, so that your child does not get tangled up in them. When finding an appropriate placement for your child’s crib, playpen, highchair or bed, place them away from blind cords. Your pediatrician also recommends placing furniture away from windows so that your child does not climb near a window.

The Fireplace

While the fireplace is excellent in the winter, it is important to take extra precautions to protect your baby from harm. Purchase a fireplace hearth cover because once kids learn to walk and crawl, they run a risk of falling into a fireplace. Ready-made, or even homemade cushiony devices that go around the hearth will also help to keep your child out of harm’s way.

Stairways

If you have any stairways in your home, install gates once your child begins to crawl. Place the gates at the bottom of stairways to prevent them from getting up the stairs, and if you are worried about them getting out of the bedroom, place a gate on the doorway to their room. Your pediatrician, also warns against placing a gate at the top of the steps because some babies can climb up a gate and fall from an even higher height.

Talk to your pediatrician for more tips on how to properly baby-proof your home.

By Millenium Pediatrics
November 03, 2017
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Sesamoid Injuries  

Everything You Need to Know About Sesamoid Injuries

 


Think you have a sesamoid injury? Sesamoids are bones embedded in tendons. Sesamoid injuries are often associated with activities requiring increased pressure on the foot, such as tennis, basketball, running, and football. Podiatrists diagnose and treat various foot problems, including sesamoid injuries. Here's everything you've ever wanted to know about sesamoid injuries.

Types of Sesamoid Injuries

Sesamoid injuries can involve the bones, tendons, and surrounding tissue in the joint. Sesamoiditis is an injury involving inflammation of the sesamoid bones and tendons. A sesamoid fracture is an acute or chronic fracture in the sesamoid bone. Turf toe is an injury to the soft tissue surrounding the big toe joint. 

Sesamoid Injury Causes

Sesamoid injuries can be caused by landing too hard on the foot after a fall or jump. Cracks in the sesamoid bones can be caused by wear and tear on the foot over time. People with high arches are at risk for developing sesamoid injuries. Frequently wearing high heels can also be a contributing factor. 

Sesamoid Injury Symptoms

The most common symptom of a sesamoid injury is pain when you move your big toe, stand, run, jump, or walk. With a fracture, the pain will be immediate, whereas with sesamoiditis, pain may develop gradually. A sesamoid injury may be painful for weeks to months. Bruising and swelling may or may not be present.

Sesamoid Injury Diagnosis

If you think you have a sesamoid injury, see a podiatrist for proper diagnosis and treatment. Your podiatrist will ask about your symptoms, activities, and medical history and examine your foot. To diagnose your foot problem, your podiatrist may order X-rays and laboratory tests.

Sesamoid Injury Treatment

Inflammation and pain are treated with oral medications or steroid injections. A pad may be placed in your shoe to cushion the sesamoid area. Your foot may be placed in a cast and crutches may be used to take pressure off of your foot. The rehabilitation period following immobilization may include physical therapy, such as therapeutic exercises and ultrasound therapy. Your podiatrist may recommend surgery if your symptoms persist after nonsurgical treatment. 

A sesamoid injury can affect your day-to-day activities and make life frustrating and miserable. Life always offers us another chance to get back on track. It's called today. Get relief today by scheduling an appointment with a podiatrist near you. A podiatrist can provide all the relief you need, with relatively little expense or hassle.

By Millenium Pediatrics
October 16, 2017
Category: Children's Health
Tags: Nose Bleeds  

While nosebleeds can be scary for a child, they are rarely a cause for alarm. Nosebleeds are typically common in children ages 3 to 10 years, and will often stop on their own with safe treatment at home.  Our pediatrician is available to provide you with tips on how to properly stop a nosebleed.

If your child experiences a nosebleed, it is important to do the following to stop the bleeding:

  • Remain calm and reassure your child.
  • Gently pinch the soft part of the nose with a tissue or clean washcloth.
  • Keep pressure on the nose for about 10 minutes.
  • Do not have your child lean back, as this may cause blood to flow down the back of the throat.
  • Have your child relax after a nosebleed.
  • Discourage nose blowing, picking or rubbing, and any rough play.

If your child experiences frequent nosebleeds, contact your pediatrician for further diagnosis and treatment options.

By Millenium Pediatrics
October 04, 2017
Category: Safety
Tags: Poisons   Safety  

Young children explore the world by putting things in their mouth. For this reason, more than one million children under the age of six are victims of accidental poisoning each year. To help protect and keep your child safe, your pediatrician offers advice for identifying and locking up toxic materials and knowing what to do if they touch, inhale or swallow something poisonous.

Common Examples

Medicines: Vitamins and minerals, cold medicine, allergy and asthma medicine, ibuprofen, acetaminophen

Household Products: moth balls, furniture polish, drain cleaners, weed killers, insect or rat poisons, lye, pant thinners, dishwasher detergent, antifreeze, windshield washer fluid, gasoline, kerosene, lamp oil

How to Poison Proof Your Home

To maintain a healthy, safe home, your pediatrician offers these safety rules:

  • Keep harmful products locked up and out of the reach of your child
  • Use safety latches or locks to keep drawers and cabinets closed tight
  • Take care during stressful times
  • Never refer to any type of medicine as candy
  • Don’t rely on child-resistant containers
  • Never leave alcohol within the reach of your child
  • Call the Poison Help Line at (800) 222-1222 or your pediatrician if your child swallows a substance that is not food
  • Keep products in their original containers, as to not confuse your child
  • Read labels before using any product
  • Always keep a watchful eye on your child
  • Check your home for old medications and dispose of them properly
  • Move purses, luggage and grocery bags away from prying hands

Talk to your pediatrician today for more information on how to properly poison proof your home. Each extra measure taken is important to protecting your child from harm in your home.





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