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Posts for category: Child Health Care

By Millennium Pediatrics
December 17, 2018
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Child Care   Weight  

Maintaining an optimum weight is important for the health of your little one.

It’s never too early to make sure that your child is adopting the best habits for maintaining a healthy weight. After all, with obesity on the rise among our children and teens, it’s so important that we are doing everything we can to keep kids healthy and to prevent serious health problems that can arise as a result of obesity. These habits, along with visiting a pediatrician for regular care and advice on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, can keep your child feeling their best.

If your child is overweight there are certain things you can do to help them lose the weight and to maintain a healthy BMI (body mass index),

 

Lead by Example

Children pick up a lot of their habits from their parents, and it’s certainly much easier to eat in an unhealthy fashion if everyone in the family is. This is the time to truly evaluate the family’s eating habits as a whole. Are your meals healthy, balanced, and nutritious or do you find yourself going out for fast food or heating up prepared meals? If parents make healthier eating choices children are more likely to, as well.

 

Get Active

While we all seem to be glued to electronics these days, it’s important to power down and to get some regular physical activity. This can include joining a school sports team, community sports, or even going out in the backyard and kicking a ball around. Children should get at least 60 minutes of physical activity a day.

 

Choose Healthy Snacks

When your child comes home from school are they rushing to grab cookies, potato chips, or other unhealthy snack items? While these foods can certainly be fun and enjoyable in moderation, they shouldn’t be the norm. Instead of stocking the house with junk food, opt for things like peanut butter or hummus on apples or veggies. If you aren’t sure which kinds of healthy snacks to get, talk to your child’s pediatrician for recommendations and advice.

 

Get Some Shut Eye

It’s important that your child is getting enough sleep each and every night. In fact, children that don’t get enough sleep may actually be more likely to become overweight or obese. Making sure that your child regularly receives eight hours a night is a great way to set them towards a healthy lifestyle.

 

Concerned? Give Us a Call!

If your child is having challenges with their weight it’s important to turn to a pediatrician who can provide you with the most effective and safest methods to help shed the excess weight and to maintain a healthier lifestyle.

By Millennium Pediatrics
April 02, 2018
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Allergies   Common Cold  

Child SneezingYour child is sneezing, coughing and congested. Is it the common cold? Is it seasonal allergies? What is the best way to give them relief from these symptoms?

Allergies and colds often have overlapping symptoms, including a stuffy or runny nose, cough and low energy. It can be difficult for parents to know whether their child is battling a stubborn virus or having an allergic reaction.

Common Cold

Kids with a cold may feel achy and develop a sore throat, cough, runny or stuffy nose and low-grade fever. A cold usually doesn’t last longer than a few days before it starts to improve. Since common colds are viral infections, they can’t be cured with antibiotics. To ease your child’s symptoms or discomfort, make sure your child is getting plenty of fluids and rest. 

Allergies

If your child’s stuffy nose lingers for several days, this may be an indication that they are suffering from allergies and not a cold. In fact, allergy symptoms can last for weeks to months.

Tell-tale signs that your child has allergies and not a cold include:

  • Cold-like symptoms linger for more than a few weeks
  • Chronic (continual) cough
  • Mucous is clear
  • Persistent stuffy nose
  • Itching of the nose, ears, mouth and/or throat
  • Itchy, watery, red eyes
  • Puffiness around the eyes
  • Wheezing, difficulty breathing and other respiratory symptoms
  • Unexplained bouts of diarrhea, abdominal cramps and other intestinal symptoms

In some cases, reducing the triggers that are causing the allergic reaction can control many allergy symptoms. This may include washing your child’s bedding and toys to remove dust and bacteria, bathing pets regularly, vacuuming your home at least once a week and replacing furnace and air filters every few months.

Although common colds and allergies have similar symptoms, there are distinct clues that help parents differentiate one from the other. When in doubt about your child’s symptoms, always contact your pediatrician.  

By Millennium Pediatrics
January 03, 2018
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Safety   Infant   Baby Care  
Your child’s safety is your responsibility, even when your baby is sleeping.Your pediatrician is available to provide you with helpful tips to keep your baby safe while he or she is sleeping.

While you may find relief when your baby is asleep, it is still important to practice safety to ensure your baby’s health. Some helpful tips offered from your pediatrician include:
  • All infants should be put down for sleep on their back to reduce the risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)
  • Avoid soft bedding that might suffocate your baby, such as pillows, blankets, plush toys, and bumpers.
  • Crib slats should be 2 3/8 inches apart or less so that your baby’s head cannot get trapped.
  • Keep your baby’s room at a moderate temperature and dress them in a way that will prevent them from overheating to also reduce the risk for SIDS.
  • Share a bedroom with your newborn—but not a bed.
  • Avoid devices marketed to reduce the risk of SIDS, such as sleep positioners.

Nursing your baby and making sure that your baby gets all of the recommended vaccines can help protect against SIDS. Your pediatrician is available to provide you with the right information to protect your baby and keep him or her healthy and that includes proper care while they are sleeping.

By Millennium Pediatrics
December 15, 2017
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Tanning   Adolescents   Skin Cancer  

As the skin cancer rate continues to rise, many of us can’t help but wonder why people continue to expose themselves to harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation. A tan, whether it’s acquired from the pool, in a salon or through incidental exposure, is always dangerous.

The use of tanning beds today is an especially common practice among teenagers, specifically the female population. What many young girls don’t realize, however, is that the bronzed image they so desire is only the skin’s visible reaction to damage from harmful UV rays. Melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, is now the second most common cancer seen in young adults. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, nearly 28 million people tan indoors in the United States annually. Of these, 2.3 million are teens. Their findings go on to report that 70 percent of tanning salon users are Caucasian girls and women, primarily aged 16 to 29 years.

Skin cancer aside, basking in UV rays—indoor or outdoors—also leads to premature aging of the skin. That means that even just a few minutes of exposure each day over the years without protection can cause noticeable changes to the skin later in life. Freckles, age spots, leathery skin, wrinkles, saggy skin and uneven skin tone can all be traced to UV exposure. 

The good news is that skin cancer and premature aging of the skin can easily be prevented. For one, stay away from tanning beds. Pediatricians also recommend that children and teens wear proper clothing, hats and sunglasses when outdoors. Always use sunscreen and avoid exposure during peak hours of 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Finding Alternatives

There is no such thing as a safe tan. Talk to your teen about the serious, life-threatening consequences of tanning. If your teen insists on a sun-kissed glow, suggest safer sunless methods, such as spray tans and other sunless gels or creams. 

By Millennium Pediatrics
November 03, 2017
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Sesamoid Injuries  

Everything You Need to Know About Sesamoid Injuries

 


Think you have a sesamoid injury? Sesamoids are bones embedded in tendons. Sesamoid injuries are often associated with activities requiring increased pressure on the foot, such as tennis, basketball, running, and football. Podiatrists diagnose and treat various foot problems, including sesamoid injuries. Here's everything you've ever wanted to know about sesamoid injuries.

Types of Sesamoid Injuries

Sesamoid injuries can involve the bones, tendons, and surrounding tissue in the joint. Sesamoiditis is an injury involving inflammation of the sesamoid bones and tendons. A sesamoid fracture is an acute or chronic fracture in the sesamoid bone. Turf toe is an injury to the soft tissue surrounding the big toe joint. 

Sesamoid Injury Causes

Sesamoid injuries can be caused by landing too hard on the foot after a fall or jump. Cracks in the sesamoid bones can be caused by wear and tear on the foot over time. People with high arches are at risk for developing sesamoid injuries. Frequently wearing high heels can also be a contributing factor. 

Sesamoid Injury Symptoms

The most common symptom of a sesamoid injury is pain when you move your big toe, stand, run, jump, or walk. With a fracture, the pain will be immediate, whereas with sesamoiditis, pain may develop gradually. A sesamoid injury may be painful for weeks to months. Bruising and swelling may or may not be present.

Sesamoid Injury Diagnosis

If you think you have a sesamoid injury, see a podiatrist for proper diagnosis and treatment. Your podiatrist will ask about your symptoms, activities, and medical history and examine your foot. To diagnose your foot problem, your podiatrist may order X-rays and laboratory tests.

Sesamoid Injury Treatment

Inflammation and pain are treated with oral medications or steroid injections. A pad may be placed in your shoe to cushion the sesamoid area. Your foot may be placed in a cast and crutches may be used to take pressure off of your foot. The rehabilitation period following immobilization may include physical therapy, such as therapeutic exercises and ultrasound therapy. Your podiatrist may recommend surgery if your symptoms persist after nonsurgical treatment. 

A sesamoid injury can affect your day-to-day activities and make life frustrating and miserable. Life always offers us another chance to get back on track. It's called today. Get relief today by scheduling an appointment with a podiatrist near you. A podiatrist can provide all the relief you need, with relatively little expense or hassle.